minazarei:

asperatus cloud x

IT’S LIKE WATCHING THE WAVES ABOVE YOU FROM THE BOTTOM OF THE OCEAN

September 21st 2014   73148 notes   - via / source

rigidboning:

what if like

alistair never gets his own mabari because mabari never seem to imprint on him

they like bypass him and immediately feel a connection with anora

and anora winds up with an army of slobbering mabari hounds and they all try to sleep with her in the big royal bed and alistair has to sleep on a chaise because the dogs keep kicking him out of bed

September 21st 2014   112 notes   - via / source

glowcloud:

U know what would have changed my world growing up? A depiction of a gay character in children’s media as a fully fleshed out person and a positive role model

U know what is and has always been perfectly useless? “Queer representation” in the form of throwaway gay jokes aimed at adult audiences. If you think that’s good enough for our youth then fuck you

September 21st 2014   4653 notes   - via / source
"We are outraged when an Indian police officer tells a rape victim she should marry her attacker but not when a California judge says a woman wasn’t really raped because she didn’t put up enough of a fight. We are outraged at 24,000 rapes in India but not 188,380 in America."

Hoopstatic - First World Problems

I really recommend reading the entire article. Trigger warning for discussion of rape and rape culture - it’s a tough article but very important. 

(Thanks to byunbbi for submitting)

September 21st 2014   30317 notes   - via / source

rollingpenny:

fenrir-kin:

tharook:

So I had ordered a lion statuette for a Pride award but something went wrong somewhere down the line and when it arrived it had only the rear end of the lion.

It was a catastrophe.

OH FOR FUCKS SAKE

took me a second to get it

September 21st 2014   24238 notes   - via / source

elwynbrooks:

vegan-vulcan:

raccoon-eater:

lacigreen:

lalatinafeminista:

toomanyfuckscrusader:

hiddlefun:

cloudcuckoolander527:

talisguy:

Signal boosting in case anyone needed to know this. 

This is informative as heck. Show this to everyone!

This is actually some great info! Why can’t they teach this kind of thing in school??

Wow, I’ve taken health and sex ed three times during my educational process and never learned any of this. Thanks.

Definitely some important information here!

this is supa awesome.  i do think it should be noted that side effects of EC *really* vary.  when I took EC I didn’t have any symptoms whatsoever.  

The more you know~

When I took EC, my period went missing for three months. Freaked me the hell out, despite having negative pregnancy tests. You cannot imagine how relieved I was to have it back.

PLEASE don’t be scared to take EC. Like some other women, I’ve taken it and it didn’t really have any side effects. The entire scare did give me incentive to go and get an IUD so that I am doubly protected, though.

September 21st 2014   242699 notes   - via / source
"And the color of my love for you can’t be defined by shade or hue"

—thoughts on the bus (via casualdorkpatrol)
September 20th 2014   63 notes   - via / source
September 20th 2014   1105 notes   - via

seizintheday:

chARACTERS WHO DON’T THINK THEY’RE WORTH ANYTHING TEAR ME APART LIKE I WANT TO PULL THEM ASIDE AND GIVE THEM A LIST OF EVERYTHING THEY’VE DONE AND EVERYTHING THEY CAN DO BECAUSE THERE’S SO MUCH 

September 20th 2014   48339 notes   - via / source

ronan-aodhan:

i am firmly pro selfie. i am firmly pro millennial. i am firmly pro any topic or issue that gets baby boomers to write pissed off articles in salon or slate or the guardian about how the millennial generation is fucked up and narcissistic and lazy and will never be taken seriously by established powers.

September 20th 2014   31021 notes   - via / source

vasundharaa:

This is a resource post for all the Good White Persons out there. You know, the ones who say things like “It’s not my fault I’m white! Don’t generalize white people!”, or “I’m appreciating your culture! You should be proud!”, or “Why do you hate all white people, look I’m a special snowflake who’s not racist give me an award for meeting the minimum requirements for being a decent human being”.

Well, if you are actually interested in understanding racism and how it ties into cultural appropriation, please read instead of endlessly badgering PoCs on tumblr with your cliched, unoriginal arguments and repeating the same questions over and over.

On White Privilege
aka don’t blame me just because I’m white:

On Reverse Racism
aka you are being racist against white people:

On Cultural Appropriation
aka I’m just appreciating your culture:

Assorted Vials of White Tears and Miscellaneous Antidotes
aka I can’t change that I’m white/not all whites are racist/we are all humans:


Okay. I agree. I’ve been socially conditioned not to notice racism and recognize my privilege. What can I do?

I don’t care about this bullshit; you’re making a big deal out of nothing, go home and delete your blog:

September 20th 2014   129295 notes   - via / source
"I would much rather be the ‘obnoxious feminist girl’ than be complicit in my own dehumanization."

—Kathleen Hanna (via camewiththeframe)
September 20th 2014   2017 notes   - via / source

na-turalbliss:

September 20th 2014   152086 notes   - via / source

body-peace:

Intuitive Eating: 

  1. Reject the Diet Mentality. Throw out the diet books and magazine articles that offer you false hope of losing weight quickly, easily, and permanently. Get angry at the lies that have led you to feel as if you were a failure every time a new diet stopped working and you gained back all of the weight. If you allow even one small hope to linger that a new and better diet might be lurking around the corner, it will prevent you from being free to rediscover Intuitive Eating.
  2. Honor Your Hunger. Keep your body biologically fed with adequate energy and carbohydrates. Otherwise you can trigger a primal drive to overeat. Once you reach the moment of excessive hunger, all intentions of moderate, conscious eating are fleeting and irrelevant. Learning to honor this first biological signal sets the stage for re-building trust with yourself and food.
  3. Make Peace with Food. Call a truce, stop the food fight! Give yourself unconditional permission to eat. If you tell yourself that you can’t or shouldn’t have a particular food, it can lead to intense feelings of deprivation that build into uncontrollable cravings and, often, bingeing When you finally “give-in” to your forbidden food, eating will be experienced with such intensity, it usually results in Last Supper overeating, and overwhelming guilt.
  4. Challenge the Food Police. Scream a loud “NO” to thoughts in your head that declare you’re “good” for eating under 1000 calories or “bad” because you ate a piece of chocolate cake. The Food Police monitor the unreasonable rules that dieting has created . The police station is housed deep in your psyche, and its loud speaker shouts negative barbs, hopeless phrases, and guilt-provoking indictments. Chasing the Food Police away is a critical step in returning to Intuitive Eating.
  5. Respect Your Fullness. Listen for the body signals that tell you that you are no longer hungry. Observe the signs that show that you’re comfortably full. Pause in the middle of a meal or food and ask yourself how the food tastes, and what is your current fullness level?
  6. Discover the Satisfaction Factor. The Japanese have the wisdom to promote pleasure as one of their goals of healthy living In our fury to be thin and healthy, we often overlook one of the most basic gifts of existence—the pleasure and satisfaction that can be found in the eating experience. When you eat what you really want, in an environment that is inviting and conducive, the pleasure you derive will be a powerful force in helping you feel satisfied and content. By providing this experience for yourself, you will find that it takes much less food to decide you’ve had “enough”.
  7. Honor Your Feelings Without Using Food. Find ways to comfort , nurture, distract, and resolve your issues without using food. Anxiety, loneliness, boredom, anger are emotions we all experience throughout life. Each has its own trigger, and each has its own appeasement. Food won’t fix any of these feelings. It may comfort for the short term, distract from the pain, or even numb you into a food hangover. But food won’t solve the problem. If anything, eating for an emotional hunger will only make you feel worse in the long run. You’ll ultimately have to deal with the source of the emotion, as well as the discomfort of overeating.
  8. Respect Your Body. Accept your genetic blueprint. Just as a person with a shoe size of eight would not expect to realistically squeeze into a size six, it is equally as futile (and uncomfortable) to have the same expectation with body size. But mostly, respect your body, so you can feel better about who you are. It’s hard to reject the diet mentality if you are unrealistic and overly critical about your body shape.
  9. Exercise—Feel the Difference. Forget militant exercise. Just get active and feel the difference. Shift your focus to how it feels to move your body, rather than the calorie burning effect of exercise. If you focus on how you feel from working out, such as energized, it can make the difference between rolling out of bed for a brisk morning walk or hitting the snooze alarm. If when you wake up, your only goal is to lose weight, it’s usually not a motivating factor in that moment of time.
  10. Honor Your Health—Gentle Nutrition. Make food choices that honor your health and tastebuds while making you feel well. Remember that you don’t have to eat a perfect diet to be healthy. You will not suddenly get a nutrient deficiency or gain weight from one snack, one meal, or one day of eating. It’s what you eat consistently over time that matters, progress not perfection is what counts.
September 20th 2014   22445 notes   - via / source

Survivors Speak Out Presents:

selfcareafterrape:

To a young girl unafraid of life

Dear child,

I hope this finds you well.
I hope you find me well.
Mostly, I hope you find you.

Someday, you will notice your middle school choir teacher’s breasts.
You will hope nobody notices you noticing.
You will wonder if it makes you gay.
You will wonder if it makes you bad.
You will apologize silently for your noticing.
You will say nothing.

Someday, you will find words for you.
You will read feminist and sex-positive literature.
You will find a label that makes you feel at home.
You will wonder why you needed a label in the first place.
You will remember the fear of noticing.
You will put on the nametag.

Someday, your urges will become the party trick you never wanted.
You will be imagined in sex scenes over which you have no control.
You will be the butt of jokes, the object of mass fantasy.
You will be told it is an excuse.
You will be replaced by your label, your body written over with porn titles and tragic headlines.
You will regret putting on your nametag.

Someday, someone will interpret your sexuality as consent.
You will say no.
You will say no.
You will say no.
You will say nothing.
You will hold your breath and close your eyes and pray for the tsunami to pass quickly.

Someday, almost everyone else will interpret your sexuality as consent.
You will report it.
You will explain to police officers and administrators what consent means.
You will tell them that pansexuality and bisexuality are real.
You will tell them that your sexuality is not a permission slip for sexual aggression and assault.
You will paint over your nametag.

Someday, it will get better.
You will stop the nightmares and panic attacks.
You will find someone who will hold you while you shake.
You will learn to love and lust again.
You will learn what respect feels like.
You will settle for no less.

Until then, little one, be brave.
Someday, it will become clear.
You will be brave.

by the lovely Sara Lyons

September 20th 2014   30 notes   - via
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